Hypatia: The First Female Mathematician

Hypatia learned a lot about mathematics and science from her father, Theon. He shared his knowledge with Hypatia.

Hypatia: The First Female Mathematician

Once upon a time, it was thought that women means decorating the house, doing household work and nurture their child. But they have the right to gain knowledge and also research .Many women have tried to earn knowledge. Some of them write their name in the history. Hypatia is one them. She is the first woman mathematician.

As thrilling is the rise of Hypatia, her farewell was smashing and terrible. Her date of birth is unknown to all. She was born in 350 or 370 AD [1] in Alexandria, Egypt which was the center of learning for western civilization [2]. His father's name is Theon who was a famous mathematician and astronomer. Theon was a professor of mathematics at Alexandria University [4]. He preserved Euclid’s Element; that’s why everyone remembers him [3].

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Hypatia learned a lot about mathematics and science from her father, Theon. Theon shared his knowledge with Hypatia [4]. Very soon, she began interested in mathematics and science. Most historians believe that she has been earned more understanding than his father [4].

In her education, Theon told Hypotia to go to different parts of the world and he also taught her how to convince people with the words. Hypatia became a grave speaker. That’s why people came to her to study and learn from her [4]. He could easily explain various complex subjects of mathematics, philosophy and astronomy to the students. She could give her speech very strickly.

For her outstanding knowledge, Hypatia became the head of Platonist school at Alexandra, where her father was a teacher and she became a fellow of her father [6]. She lectured on mathematics and philosophy. Hypatia outreach the philosophy of Plato and Aristotle in her speeches. She was teaching at her school about the philosophy of Neplatonism. Her teaching was based on the Plotinus who was the founder of Neoplatonism and Iamblichus [6].

Hypatia has done significant things in her career. She worked on the algebraic equation and conic section [8]. There is no evidence that Hypatia has done any research on mathematics [6]. She helped her father writing an explanation on Ptolemy’s Almagest. She helped her father to create a new version of Euclid's Element. Though she worked with her father, she has written an explanation of Diophatus’s Arithametica [6].

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Hypatia's’ farewell is outrageous and grievous. She did not die naturally; she was murdered in 415 AD. In March 415 AD, as Hypatia was traveling through the city, the monk’s militia pulled her out of her car and killed her brutally. The chapter on Alexandria’s research ends with the death of Hypatia. It is thought that she was the last researcher and teacher at Alexandria University.

Hypatia was a tremendous woman during her time. Her contribution to mathematics is significant. She was the most popular teacher and public speaker in her time. She is the inspiration for all female mathematicians.

Reference:

  1. https://biography.yourdictionary.com/articles/who-was-the-first-famous-woman-mathematician.html#:~:text=Many would agree that the,as for her mathematical work.
  2. https://mathsci2.appstate.edu/~sjg/ncctm/activities/hypatia/hypatia.htm
  3. https://www.britannica.com/biography/Hypatia
  4. https://www.agnesscott.edu/lriddle/women/hypatia.htm
  5. https://eu.lottie.com/blogs/strong-women/hypatia-biography-for-kids
  6. https://mathshistory.st-andrews.ac.uk/Biographies/Hypatia/
  7. https://www.britannica.com/biography/Hypatia  
  8. https://uh.edu/engines/epi215.htm
  9. https://www.prothomalo.com/bigganchinta/article/1670884

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